Global Souvenirs and All-Around Amenities in Montreal

Like most parents, Bela Xavier and Andres Escobar wanted to get their family out of an urban setting and into a roomier house with distance where their kids could roam. After locating a house near the water off West Island in Montreal, the couple started to overhaul the entire mess. “We removed layers of wallpaper, an old smelly olive green carpeting, as well as old ceilings which were rotten with water damage,” remembers Xavier. Except for one small stairway wall that contributes to the basement, the international couple — Xavier has Mozambique roots, and Escobar includes a Colombian background — revamped everything, including their own diverse, global style on the way.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Designer Andres Escobar, Bela Xavier and sons Joshua and Corey
Location:
West Island, Montreal
Size: 5,000 square feet; 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, and a basement having a wine cellar

Esther Hershcovich

They maintained the general layout of the home’s original structure from the living area but enlarged the openings between spaces. Metal stair frosted glass keep the room open and railings.

The wall of masks in the entryway was motivated by a prototype for a restaurant Escobar designed. Since the pair travels, the set grows. The shelving to the right used to maintain Escobar’s office; today it displays travel mementos.

Esther Hershcovich

Escobar designed the Macassar Ebony media wall unit so that the TV would be flush with it.

Seating: designed by Andres Escobar, made by Mirage Upholstery; ottoman: cowhide, Natuzzi

Esther Hershcovich

A wood chest with ivory details hails from Xavier’s birthplace in Mozambique. Atop it on the far right is a precious pot given to Escobar by Princess Amira al-Taweel of Saudi Arabia.

Lamp: Fringe 5, designed by Edward van Vliet for Moooi; wall treatment: silver-gray Venetian stucco

Esther Hershcovich

Wanting an alternative-style fireplace, Xavier and Escobar purchased one from a regional antiques store. A flat mirror provides a sense of thickness and bounces light around the room.

Esther Hershcovich

The living area leads to a stunning kitchen and dining room, the site of several dinner parties.

Chandelier: Swarovski; flooring: Earl Blue granite; cabinets: cherry

Esther Hershcovich

The kitchen is a mixture of wood and shiny surfaces, two of the couple’s favorite finishes. The backsplash is constructed of beveled mirror mosaics. What was a window is now an open passing into a sunroom.

Esther Hershcovich

In the winter the cedar-framed sunroom, or conservatory, is an excellent location for enjoying the opinion of this snow-filled pool and yard.

Armchairs: Poltrona Frau; round sofa: suede, designed by Andres Escobar, made by Mirage Upholstery

Esther Hershcovich

Escobar left the exterior structure as is, opening the doors and window into the sunroom and adding the same stone walls used within the home.

Esther Hershcovich

In the remodeled master bath, a top horizontal mirror hangs above an ebony vanity to add definition. This area was a small bedroom, and the entry was closed off from the main stairway.

Tub: Cube Series, Wetstyle; faucet: VC848A, Cube Collection, Wetstyle

Esther Hershcovich

The couple transformed what was the garage into a guest suite. A recessed ceiling with semiflush lighting solved a low-duct problem.

Esther Hershcovich

The guest area is often employed by Xavier’s mother. White and white family images in matching frames create a gallery wall opposite the bed.

Esther Hershcovich

A pocket opens into a 5- by 8-foot guest toilet.

Esther Hershcovich

A stairway leads from the guest package into a split-level basement full with a family room and wine cellar. The remaining side of the stairs is the sole remnant of the home’s original structure.

Esther Hershcovich

Both use this refrigerated cellar when entertaining and then have pride in their own wine collection. Whale-tail wooden stools made of laminated timber sit with a console pub they bought in Indonesia. An alabaster lighting fixture casts a soft glow.

Large decanters have an impressive collection of corks from bottles enjoyed over the previous three decades.

Esther Hershcovich

The couple built a double-car garage, where they often host parties in summer. The back wall holds a collection of mirrors and license plates.

Esther Hershcovich

A Trevi barrel sauna from the terrace is used both in summer and winter. The terrace also has a spa and barbecue grill, and to the right is a treehouse Escobar constructed for both boys.

Esther Hershcovich

The garage into the left was inserted to replace the one they turned into a guest suite.

Esther Hershcovich

Andres Escobar and Bela Xavier will celebrate their 30th anniversary in 2013 and are excited to share many more years into their dream home.

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How To 50 Design-Loving Pets

Every week homeowners around the world open their doors to our leading photographers, who profile their creative homes. While we love glancing in their insides and hearing about their design choices, their pets are as much of a visual treat. Meet some of our favourite pugs, ponies and other animal friends who have made a stylish look within our My series.

Esther Hershcovich

Clara the parrot is free to fly around this arty, furniture-hack-filled home in Israel.

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Ashley Camper Photography

Charles the cat made the big move from Manhattan to Maui and seems to be adjusting to the laid-back Hawaiian lifestyle just nice.

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Theresa Fine

Ty that the Chihuahua sits at his place on a chesterfield couch, wearing a gentlemanly sweater.

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Rikki Snyder

English bulldog Tater Tot is serious about having fun in this lively, candy-colored flat in Manhattan. He’s sitting on a red chaise that anchors his owner’s library. Behind him the walls are adorned using a DIY wine cork project, a deconstructed Scooby-Doo lunchbox and also a poster from a 1984 series of Jonathan Borofsky’s job at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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Angela Flournoy

Finley the cat is perched ever on a few of his favourite spots in a colorful home in Dallas.

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Corynne Pless

Bailey that the Yorkie protects her owner’s beloved leather armchair. This home in Buford, Georgia, is decorated in a French country style with antique finds and tiny treasures.

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FISHER ARCHitecture

Mr. Martin feels right at home between design and art books. Anyone, book club?

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Corynne Pless

Luna the dog appears comfy in a corner nook in a West Asheville, North Carolina, home adorned with classic frames showing meaningful family keepsakes.

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Rikki Snyder

How could you resist a gentle tablecloth tug from this sweet kitty named Delilah? The mint-green seat was painted by her really creative proprietor, Kristin Nicholas.

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Lindsay von Hagel

Australian shepherds Oscar and Penny are begging for somebody to join them on this particular leather chaise. This is their owner’s creative space, housing a collection of inspirational items, books and a huge easel for painting. The Chevrolet truck tailgate is a snowball locate.

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Jason Snyder

Lakota, an Alaskan Malamute mix, is a happy camper before a wooden console showing travel mementos.

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Heather Banks

Mae the cat appears fairly happy in the master bedroom of this Austin, Texas, home. Behind her is a gallery wall of postcards by Yoshitomo Nara.

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Sarah Greenman

Rocky and Sara Garza’s goldendoodle, Samson, strikes a pose before a Native American portrait which Sara’s grandma painted.

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Mina Brinkey

Merlin that the fantastic Dane isn’t a stranger to classic style. He’s lounging in an old army cot on a patio in Tampa, Florida.

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Hilary Walker

Diego is thrilled to be lounging in a midcentury armchair and looks unimpressed from the grazing buffalo that appears on.

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Kimberley Bryan

This cat lolls from an Explanation walkway in Washington, absorbing its warmth. “I can’t even remember the cats’ names,” says homeowner Cari Horning. “It is just how it is. They are farm cats. Mousers. They do not come inside.”

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Rikki Snyder

Fourteen acres in upstate New York offer miniature horse Kokomo lots of space for drifting. He’s joined by a barn filled with different animals — six horses, four goats, five donkeys, nine cows, two barn cats, 1 house cat, two dogs, two parakeets, ducks and fish. Sometimes Kokomo’s owners will hitch on a little saddle so their granddaughter can ride him.

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Rikki Snyder

Pumpkin the pygmy goat has been the pet of New Yorkers Jen and Dick Lanne for Quite a While. Jen explains her as “a candy yet naughty monster that loves to get into everything!”

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Luci.D Interiors

Henry that the dachshund is prepared to take a ride down a slide to meet his owners on a family farm in Australia.

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Hoi Ning Wong

Inez, Friendly, Big Red, Struggles and Eden are just five hens which get to enjoy personalized nesting boxes and have loads of surfaces on which to ramble. The canvas sail over provides protection from the sun.

“My husband and I’ll head out and have a glass of wine in the coop from time to time,” says Michelle Pettigrew of Hillsborough, California. “We call it chicken therapy.”

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Luci.D Interiors

Australian border collie Sassy escapes the warmth on York stone paving in the shade of a veranda. This puppy is lucky to relish 70 acres of lush grazing property in the scenic town of Sutton Forest, halfway between Sydney and Canberra in Australia.

Luci.D Interiors

Sassy is joined by Andrew, the resident peacock, who strolls the 70-acre house in all his splendor.

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Sarah Natsumi Moore

Sherman that the beagle relaxes on his owner’s bed in Austin, Texas, under a 1920s framed picture that once hung in the home of this great-grandmother of among those owners.

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Esther Hershcovich

Sophia the kitty takes in each detail of her environment, such as an old magician’s tableturned–coffee table.

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Sarah Greenman

Munchie is a rescue dog and is pleased to share this screened-in porch, that doubles as a play area for a Dallas couple’s daughter, Goldie.

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Corynne Pless

Elvis, a dalmatian combination, appreciates the design and colour in this New Orleans Victorian.

Le Klein

Penny the cat listens in on household storytime taking place on a DIY banquette.

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Theresa Fine

This cat loves napping on a 19th-century bolt seat in a backyard loft-like space with vaulted ceilings and skylights.

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Shannon Malone

Lulu, a curly-haired dog, hangs out from the entrance area of her Santa Cruz, California, home. She is lying near a painting of Enid Brock’s great-grandmother.

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Margot Hartford Photography

Gypsy finds this built-in banquette a relaxing location where to view neighboring houseboats from the San Francisco Bay.

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Mary Prince Photography

Kasey that the Yorkshire terrier doesn’t appear to realize how lucky he is to run around in this Cape Cod, Massachusetts, beach house. Lean steel support beams encased in coffered ceiling moldings replaced the initial home’s much larger wooden beams.

Hilary Walker

Beagle–Boston terrier mix Lucy lounges on a sectional that divides open-plan living area. Behind Lucy hangs a “214” signal representing his owners’ wedding (Valentine’s Day) in addition to a Dallas area code.

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Mina Brinkey

Pugs Theo and Sydney mix right in with this couch and armchair on a lazy afternoon. Their guardian, Katie Gagnon, says, “All of my furniture is that the colour of my pugs, because they drop.”

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Hilary Walker

Aubrey and Kale Butcher’s curious beagle, Oliver, lounges on a neutral-colored sectional. Behind him are first built-in shelves with their backs painted to allow the couple’s collection of classic books and travel mementos stand out.

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Rikki Snyder

Judas the cat adds a minimalist silhouette to jewellery and fabric designer Caitlin Mociun’s eclectic flat in Brooklyn, New York. The flat was once a pub in the Brooklyn Navy Yard before it was gutted and converted to housing. High ceilings, painted brick, large windows and natural lighting mark the open and airy space.

Shannon Malone

Ginger that the Yorkie relaxes to a convertible sofa bed below a gallery of dog silhouettes.

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Shannon Malone

Eager to present for every picture, Burton blends in perfectly with all the white and beachy inside of this California home.

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Sarah Greenman

Thatcher leisurely strolls around his French country–style home in Dallas, which brims with flea market treasures, such as these dining room seats.

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Jason Snyder

Milo, a 13-year-old pug, poses unimpressed in front of a living room’s custom reclaimed-wood bookcases in a Pittsburgh home.

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Lucy Call

DIY design suits Earl, a Bichon-terrier combination, who’s maintained the sofa in a Salt Lake City home called a “sort of mutt.”

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Alex Amend Photography

Little dog, large space — Chihuahua Begonia is observed perched on her favorite couch in a San Francisco attic.

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Jeni Lee

Chocolate Lab Chico loves hanging out in this particular furniture retail shop attached to some family’s home in Australia.

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Candy the cat has lived in her Pittsburgh semicircular-shaped home since 1995 and has been embraced by Bob Moore and Scott Wise following the passing of Edith “Ditta” Lipkind, among the home’s original owners.

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Sarah Greenman

These Rhode Island Reds and Araucanas are hardy chickens that get to relish 7 sprawling acres in New Mansfield, Texas. They are also a huge help to their owners, Mary and Eddie Phillips. As the homeowners’ edible gardens evolved, hungry grasshoppers took a toll on plants. “We did not want to use chemicals,” Mary says, “so predatory birds seemed like the best idea. What could be greater than turning grasshoppers into eggs?”

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Theresa Fine

A household in Bennington, Vermont, shares their 100-acre house with numerous pets, such as their Great Pyrenees, Sophie, and their Newfoundland, Grace.

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Must-Know Modern Homes: The Robie House

The Frederick C. Robie House in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood is Frequently considered the greatest example of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie-style homes. From the first decade of the 20th century, Wright developed his own approach to architecture that responded to the Midwestern scene, freed in the prevailing Victorian architecture (a style he followed during the previous decade because his work evolved) and strove to get a democratic ideal. Formal traits of the Prairie style include, as he also wrote, “softly sloping roofs, low proportions, quiet sky lines, suppressed heavy-set chimneys and sheltering overhangs, low terraces and out-reaching walls sequestering private gardens”

Appreciation of the home was nearly instant, thanks in no small part to Wright himself, who picked up and left his clinic (and individual relationships) in Oak Park, just west of Chicago, and trekked to Europe to help assemble the famed Wasmuth Portfolio of his work. His passing helped cement the Robie House since the peak of the Prairie style, and if he returned a year later his architecture took a new course, less stylistically rooted in the previous century. Even though the Robie House appears traditional a century later (partly because of successors replicating Wright stylistically), its own striking cantilevers and horizontal lines, open plan and advanced mechanical systems looked forward to new paths of domesticity.

Robie House at a Glance
Year constructed: 1910
Architect:
Frank Lloyd Wright
Location: Chicago
Seeing info: Guided and group tours available
Size: 9,000 square feet

Longer: 10 Must-Know Modern Homes

Frank Lloyd Wright’s customer, the engineer and bike maker Frederick C. Robie, was not yet 30 years old when he commissioned Wright to design him a home. Before he found Wright, other architects really responded to his listing of have-nots — wooden home, cramped spaces — with, “You want one of those damn Wright homes”

Along with having preferences away from the prevailing traditional designs, Robie was quoted as stating, “I wanted sunlight in my living room before I went into work, and that I wished to have the ability to look out and down the street to my neighbors without needing them invade my privacy” I am imagining Robie did not expect such a stunning and iconic style to direct from his fantasies.

The Robie House is located on the northeast corner of South Woodlawn Avenue and East 58th Street, on the edge of the University of Chicago campus. Across the street is that the college’s Graduate School of Business, however if the home has been completed, the view has been open into the Midway Plaisance Park one block to the south west.

Wright exploited the view, and Robie’s desire for sunlight and to look in his neighbors, through expansive glass walls facing south west. Within this straight-on perspective of the south elevation, the home’s three degrees could be grasped: Just below street level is the billiard room, playroom and garage (from frame to the right); the elevated first degree is where the dining and living rooms, kitchen and servants’ quarters are located; the smaller third floor with bedrooms covers the construction.

On the left side of the third floor is the chimney, among the most important components in Wright’s residential architecture, Prairie and later. As we’ll see, the hearth on the first two floors serves to split up the expansive open programs.

One way of ascertaining if a Prairie-style home is designed by Wright or someone else is to ask, “Where’s the front door?” If the solution is, ” Right there,” it’s designed by someone else, because Wright tended to conceal the entrances from passersby. This is even more pronounced in the Robie House, in which the entrance is located on the north side of the home, under the large overhanging western eave viewed here.

The south side and low brick wall maintain solitude along the long pavement, but Wright put the entrance on the north to take advantage of the cooling aspects of the roofing. Writer and critic Reyner Banham applauded that, stating, “It supplies a cool-air tank that operates so efficiently, even on still thundery times of high humidity”

Even with a straightforward view of the west facade, the entrance is difficult to determine (it’s to the left of the bowed windows beneath the roof). The brick wall is greater here than on the south side, providing a stronger sense of privacy and safety, even as the road to the entrance is a few feet off.

In these photos from Wright’s Wasmuth Portfolio, systems old and new are highlighted: the hearth (a view of the next floor, I think), and the perimeter lighting and wood grilles in the living room ceiling on the right. The latter is of particular interest, due to the way they work collectively and with the rest of the home (they accompany the rhythm of the chimney), and also the way their ornamentation deflects the mechanical creativity set up.

The integral lighting happened not only with all the globes but also above the timber grilles. They provided a dappled light in the edge of the space. However, the cavity above the grilles also functioned to help ventilate the space in the warm months and draw the humidity out in the both well-integrated radiators in the cold months.

So, is the measure in the ceiling just to accommodate the 2 forms of lighting and the venting? No. The main reason behind it is the steel beams that allow the big, open spaces and striking cantilevers. And herein lies one particular region where the Robie House is a trailblazing modern house. While the steel construction might be masked from the stepped ceiling and wood trim, it had been known to architects that watched Wright’s drawings. The home of steel, concrete and brick pointed forward to fresh means of residential construction.

Much has been written about the routines on the glass in Wright’s Prairie houses, largely the way they’re abstraction of grasses and plants located on prairie landscapes. That certainly comes from the bowed window on the west side of the living space, but so does the way the vertical thrust of these abstractions is balanced from the diagonals, as if the latter were stretched vertically, strengthening the prevailing geometries of the home (horizontal lines and low slopes).

This close-up of the globe light with square framework exemplifies how Wright straddled 19th-century notions of design (especially evident in all that wood trim around the light) and 20th-century moderniziation (hardwired lighting). Additionally, it is interesting to check in this fixture relative to some lamp from Greene & Greene’s Gamble House; Wright’s fixture looks rather primitive in comparison.

Even near 50 years after the home’s completion, House and Home magazine stated (in 1957), “The home introduced so many theories in planning and construction that its full influence cannot be measured accurately for many years to come. With this home, much of contemporary architecture as we know it now, might not exist”

Contrast this statement with Philip Johnson’s insult that Wright had been “the best architect of the 19th century” and his departing Wright from the 1932 International Style exhibition at MoMA. Wright’s modern architecture was not the same as what came to be called modernism in the decades after the Robie House.

House and Home‘s exalted praise of the Robie House arrived the year its owner, the Chicago Theological Seminary, threatened to demolish the home to make way for a dormitory. (Robie and his wife lived in the home for a limited while and then sold it to another family, who dwelt in the home and subsequently sold it to the seminary in 1926.) Wright, nearing 90, traveled to Chicago alongside multiple protesters to stop the demolition. Due to a range of factors, the building was saved and has since become an architectural masterpiece open to the public, courtesy of the University of Chicago and the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, which restored the home in the 21st century.

References:
Banham, Reyner. Age of the Experts: A Personal View of Modern Architecture. Harper & Row. Banham, Reyner. The Architecture of the Well-tempered Environment. University of Chicago Press, 1969. Curtis, William J.R. Modern Architecture Since 1900. Prentice-Hall, third edition, 1996 (first published in 1982).The Frederick C. Robie HouseGill, Brendan. Many Masks: A Life of Frank Lloyd Wright. Da Capo, 1998. Larkin, David and Pfeiffer, Bruce Brooks, eds. Frank Lloyd Wright Masterworks. Rizzoli. Twombly, Robert, ed. Frank Lloyd Wright: Essential Texts. W.W. Norton, 2009.

More: 10 Must-Know Modern Homes

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A New England Farmhouse Explodes With Color

Kristin Nicholas and Mark Duprey’s 1751 home was a blank canvas, painted in simple whites and pastels, but Nicholas has spent the previous 14 years layering on brushstrokes in vivid colors. A working artist famous for her knit, crochet and stitchery designs, Nicholas has made their home a genuine reflection of her ability and soul. “There isn’t a space left that is the way we found it,” she says.

at a Glance
Who lives here: Kristin Nicholas and Mark Duprey, their daughter, Julia
Location: Franklin County, Massachusetts
Size: 3,500 square feet; two bedrooms, 2 bathrooms
That’s intriguing: The couple tends to more than 300 sheep.

Rikki Snyder

Nicholas color stripped and washed the walls from the home living room in a mottled chartreuse and gold. The vintage desk is home to old photos, a grim antique typewriter that belonged to her dad and other significant pieces.

Rikki Snyder

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A 1920s sideboard once belonging to Nicholas’ great-aunt got fresh life with a glowing coat of red. Nicholas does oil and gouache painting, paints pottery, is a published illustrator and writer, and has taken up mosaics.

Watch more of Kristin Nicholas’ artwork

Sideboard paint: Satin Impervo, Benjamin Moore

Rikki Snyder

In the living room library, the homeowner created her own background by cutting shapes out of FedEx boxes, layering the contours in addition to one another and hand painting each shape.

Rikki Snyder

A large wooden chest makes a perfect ottoman with this reading nook.

Rikki Snyder

Nicholas painted the stairwell from the living room using a blue flower design.

Video: Create Your Own Mural Wall With Easy DIY Stencils and Stamps

Rikki Snyder

Another hand-painted treatment adorns the wall opposite the library sofa.

Rikki Snyder

The couple maintained the wood surround in the library. The mantel is home to family photos and other significant pieces.

Rikki Snyder

Added black and white pictures of the couple’s households are found throughout the dining room as great reminders of their farming background.

Rikki Snyder

One of Nicholas’ free-form murals adorns the dining room walls. Its chickens, birds, flowers, leaves, guinea hens and peacocks provide a tribute to the animal-friendly home. Beneath the chair rail, a plaid pattern designed with painter’s tape contrasts the playful forms over.

“Most of this year, the dining room serves as a shipping and storeroom for our different companies, but after per year at Thanksgiving it functions as a great basis for a family party,” Nicholas says.

Rikki Snyder

“I really like my set of 1920s Jacobean revival dining room furniture that came out of my great-aunt Jennie in New Jersey. It was a nasty oak-color wood when I moved it here, but I cleaned it with a thin layer of black acrylic paint,” Nicholas says. “It isn’t exactly current trend, but neither are we all. It’s chunky and sturdy and matches our home’s decoration “

Rikki Snyder

A long hallway between the living room and the kitchen carries a plush window chair sandwiched between two built-in bookshelves. It is the perfect place for resting and reading without being too excluded from the remainder of the home.

A white and blue patterned blanket and a few of Nicholas’ hand-crafted cushions decorate the cushioned chair. Her original artwork hangs beneath the wall lamps.

Rikki Snyder

A massive stool sits in a closet across the hall, decorated with a collection of framed drawings and photos.

Rikki Snyder

This Hoosier cupboard from Nicholas’ German immigrant grandmother, Frieda, was made by G.I. Sellers in Indiana in the early 1920s. Nicholas painted it bright orange and hung a bit of antique folk embroidery instead of a busted rolltop cover.

“It was in her kitchen her entire adult life and contains a flour bin with a sifter,” Nicholas says. “I keep all of my baking supplies in it and love that link with my grandma.”

Rikki Snyder

The couple gutted three chambers on the floor and transformed them into one large kitchen. The kitchen was in the cellar.

A classic wooden dining table matches the first rustic wood flooring, where Phoebe the puppy makes herself comfy. A black iron electrified oil lamp sourced in the antiques store hangs over the dining table. The corner cupboard houses Nicholas’ hand-painted ceramics.

Rikki Snyder

The kitchen is intended to mimic a British-style country kitchen, with local Ashfield schist stone countertops and milk-painted cabinetry. A slotted drainboard is carved into the rock.

A maple counter produced by one of Nicholas’ friends tops the island. “The lights are old,” she says. “On the island turned into a wacky iron lamp having an opalescent glass shade that I carried home from England soon after we purchased our house. The walls are full of pottery — some old, some new, some I made myself. It’s the nerve center of the house. I cook a lot and develop recipes to our sheep-farm site. Our kitchen works really well as a room for our loved ones and farm.”

Cabinetry: Crown Point; Granite: Galaxy stone, Ashfield

Rikki Snyder

Nicholas made the lampshades and foundations as well as a number of the pottery in the house. “I’ve painted lots of the lampshades in the house and had the lamp foundations constructed out of antique lamp parts I collected from flea markets through the years. I really like the way the light shines through the shades — they look a whole lot like stained glass,” she says.

Rikki Snyder

Two years ago the couple built an upstairs addition, which now functions as an informal dining room and seating space. The high ceilings and painted wood walls result in a bright, airy and inviting space.

Paper lanterns hang out of a wood beam in front of a gallery wall full of original artwork by Nicholas and daughter Julia. A selection of painted chairs is gathered round the dining table.

Rikki Snyder

A colorful seating area with wicker furniture sits across from the dining room, adding to the indoor-porch texture of the space. Plenty of windows make the room seem even bigger than it is.

More of Nicholas’ handmade lamps and colorful pillows keeps the upstairs space inviting and bright. The family loves this addition to their home and spends a whole lot of time relaxing .

Rikki Snyder

One of those household kittens, Delilah, plays the linen on one of Nicholas’ chairs.

Rikki Snyder

Nicholas works and teaches knitting and stitching in her downstairs studio. White walls make way for the colorful tiled flooring and chairs.

Rikki Snyder

A pink-orange wall is an appropriate background for one more bit of Nicholas’ art. First wooden beams equilibrium the saturated colour.

Rikki Snyder

This upstairs bathroom is one of two baths the couple renovated when they transferred in. A claw-foot bathtub sits on a wooden platform surrounded by beadboard, bright yellow walls and individual decorative tiles.

Rikki Snyder

Nicholas and Duprey understood this house was the one for them when they found it. “Mark called me at work and I insisted on seeing the place initially, so we drove up to the house the following day, and before I got out of the truck,” I said,’OK, we can purchase it. ”’

On the outside, the couple replaced the dilapidated cedar roof, an obsolete 1970s gambrel dormer accession, and added a mudroom.

“Our place is steeped in history, but sadly there isn’t much known about our house,” says Nicholas. “All our deeds state the year built as 1751. It was no doubt built as a farmhouse by a few of the founders of the small town. Supposedly the stagecoach used to maneuver our house!”

Rikki Snyder

Rikki Snyder

A grape arbor provides fruit and organic shade within the stone terrace in back. The stone walkway wraps around to the front of the house, passing by a second, smaller terrace area.

Rikki Snyder

The couple added this part of this house a couple of years back.

Rikki Snyder

The garden is home to a large garden and a fenced-in place for your sheep.

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An Animal Lover's Texas Sanctuary

This Texas sanctuary for rescued animals can also be Margaret Hoffman’s countryside harbor. Eighteen Oaks Sanctuary — named for the 18 trees scattered throughout the 28-acre house — is made up of a kennel and an attached home, both built to blend into the magnificent landscape. “I wanted it to fit into the environment and also have little environmental impact on the land about it,” says Hoffman.

Nick Mehl Architects worked with her to design an eco- and – animal-friendly home with a stunning perspective. A screened-in porch, a stunning collection of art and a modern aesthetic blend beautifully in this trendy, tranquil residence.

at a Glance
Who lives here: Margaret Hoffman, her 3 dogs and a variety of foster animals, including 4 horses
Location: Jonah, Texas (just north of Austin)
Size: 1,500 square feet (main house), 1,300 square feet (screened-in pool), 800 square feet (kennel); 1 bedroom, 2 bathrooms

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

Not many homeowners can put valuable art in their own pool area and not be concerned about theft — but that is one of the numerous benefits of having a screened-in pool. “I love that the swimming pool stays cleaner longer without leaves falling into it without a pesky Texas bugs,” says Hoffman. “Also, I do not need to be cautious about applying sunscreen”

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

The pool is purified by ionized oxygen no salt or chlorine. The air is not damaging to the skin or the environment; it is like swimming in warm water.

Pool: Davinci Pools, designed by Frank Matusek; display: designed by Nick Mehl

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

Concrete floors with a transparent sealant add to the kitchen’s easy aesthetic. Horizontal windows up high near the 10-foot ceilings and low down bathe the room in natural light.

Bar stools: Collectic Home

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

The living room is architect Nick Mehl’s favorite area due to the stunning natural light emitting. Hoffman purchased the “Blue Skies” neon sign with an auction hosted by artist Willie Nelson. “My late husband, Jace, and that I chaired the yearly fundraising event for the Corpus Christi Art Museum,” she says. “The theme was Blue Skies and Dark Ties, and also we had the neon sign created for the event.” Hoffman and her husband made it a custom to travel west frequently, because they loved the open heavens. “That inspired us to paint the ceilings of the house sky blue, so it looked like that hint was meant for us. It’s been part of my homes ever since.”

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

Metal and Glass railings on the staircase add to the home’s contemporary feel.

Pendant mild: Artecnica Phrena, All Modern

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

A one-story home is a frequent alternative for homeowners over age 60, but a second-story view of her house was essential to Hoffmann. She intends to stay in her brand new sanctuary, so an elevator designed by Symmetry Elevators was a sensible design solution.

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

The master bedroom is an airy escape with a fantastic view. A white modern dog mattress from DogBar lies at the foot of Hoffman’s mattress. The watercolor above the mattress is by Pat Deadman, a Corpus Christi, Texas, artist.

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

The exterior includes a cement facade and bamboo paneling, plus solar panels on top of the enclosed pool. Rainwater barrels gather water to be used throughout the home.

The timber siding was created utilizing a rain-screen technique. “The timber siding is pulled off the house together with 1-by-2 furring strips so air can flow behind the siding,” Mehl explains. “This helps to dry the wood out once it gets wet and ventilates the space behind the siding to help insulate the building.”

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

The custom-built fitting shredder is equipped with six matching indoor-outdoor dog runs, a kitty playroom and a dog-accessible shower.

Mehl appreciated the broad expanse of land that his group had to work with because they had the liberty to put the structures — including the main house as well as the kennel — anywhere they pleased.

“I find the ease of this home to be calming,” Hoffman says. “The lines and features of the house are beautiful although not distracting, so it is a ideal place for enjoying the natural beauty of the environment.”

Kailey J. Flynn Photography

The air-conditioned kennel retains the critters cool in the Texas heat while Hoffman works to see them permanent homes. Concrete floors make for easy cleanup.

telephone: Do you get a modern, pet-friendly home? Share it with us!

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Ecofriendly 'Glamping' Dome in Scotland

This vacation house, a cocoon nestled in a birch forest on the edge of a small cliff in Scotland, is visible only from the sea. Outside its own dome membrane are scenic views of the Sound of Lorne and Castle Stalker, made famous by Monty Python and the Holy Grail — views best appreciated from the outdoor spa. Indoors, “you feel as though you’re really part of the environment rather than imposing on your environment,” says homeowner Jim Milligan. “It’s like the dome has been there forever, just like the trees.”

The homeowners open their dome to vacationers who need a taste of their “glamping” (glam camping) encounter too.

at a Glance
A vacation home for: Jim Milligan and Nicola Meekin
Location: Oban, Scotland
Size: 807 square feet
That is intriguing: The dome overlooks the famous Castle Stalker, more commonly known as “Castle Aaargh” at Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

Go Glamping

The structure is held together with steel struts along with one membrane of recycled PVC which has an average life span of 25 years.

Go Glamping

Ceiling fans and windows make sure that the dome is cool at all times, particularly easy in these pieces of temperate western Scotland. Most of the membrane’s parts have a clear finish and are UV resistant.

Go Glamping

The freestanding kitchen is anchored by modular pieces: a low-energy pyrolitic oven that is flush on the laminate surface, a chopping board and a sink. There is even room for a small oven, a dish rack and cabinets. Every week, groceries are delivered to the site.

Go Glamping

The homeowners are creative with kitchen storage A overhead pan rack gets rid of the need for below-counter cabinet space, along with a small mobile island can be wheeled around to match their needs. A pair of pendant lights adds interest and task light into this modular kitchen in case the natural light coming in from the transparent areas of the dome fixtures and windows is not enough.

Go Glamping

The homeowners love classic midcentury modern layout — buying high quality iconic pieces is their way of remaining green. “We buy decor that will last a lifetime. We hunted a number of the best furniture made this century, and they sit in the pods, with guests appreciating their quality as well as beauty,” says Milligan.

Go Glamping

This window looks directly out to islands in the southwest, which means that you may watch bad weather approaching 20 minutes before it really hits the region. “Among the things which make the pods unique is the idea of being protected regardless of what the weather. You only get a sense of calm inside the dome even if it’s storming out,” says Milligan.

Go Glamping

Milligan and Meekin sometimes prefer to lounge at the cedar soaking bathtub, watching the eagles fish or the geese migrate south.

Connected: Wipe Up Nature With Outdoor Baths

Go Glamping

Each of the curved cedar sheets utilized across the dome were sourced from the local woods, which are part of the Forest Stewardship Council. Spring water is warmed by an exterior water boiler, as well as the water is sourced from a spring.

The separate shower stall, terry-cloth bathrobes and fresh towels increase the glam factor and assure that no one remaining there actually must “rough it.”

Connected: Guest Groups: Glam Your Camping

Go Glamping

The homeowners are aware that the dome is a temporary structure, and it has been their assignment to float lightly on the ground they inhabit and also to honor the dome’s natural environment. “We want to prove to ourselves that people can leave the site using minimal footprint,” says Milligan.

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The Truth About 'Straightforward' Modern Details

Among those projects that I’ve been working on is a pair of additions to a 1970s modern house in a North Shore suburb of Chicago. This home has all the modern architectural design attributes: big walls of glass, shows, a low-slope roof with interior roof drains and much more. Each one these design details are not typical for the manner of job I usually work on. As a result, and because we would like to combine the improvements to the present arrangement seamlessly, I’ve been having fun learning about just how a modern home is detailed.

Among those things that has become evident, though a bit counterintuitive, is that a modern houses likely cost more to build than the usual sized more conventional residence. While you may look at these houses and thing that the apparent absence of detail makes for a costly endeavor, you would be confused. In fact, the urge to express accuracy, rather than cover things up with trim, necessitates some exacting workmanship and precise use of materials.

Below are some modern details and the way they’re created.

John Maniscalco Architecture

The Reveal

The show is a classic modern detail. 1 instance is when the base trim is placed flush with the plane of the drywall above, but it’s separated by a gap — or show — between it and the drywall. This detail is classically modern in that each bit is ascribed while present in precisely the same plane, or flush. And it’s functional, as the foundation trim is a stronger material to maintain up to toe kicks and the like. Though this is just one really sweet and simple bit of detail, it takes a little bit of work.

First, there are generally two layers of drywall instead of the usual one, which is only about double the cost of all those walls. The base layer of drywall is put from floor to ceiling, just as every other drywall job is finished.

Secondly, the outer high, layer of drywall is cut with a distinctive molding just over (usually a half inch over) the foundation trim. The important thing is getting the width of this show perfectly even and consistent throughout the room.

Laidlaw Schultz architects

The show is also utilized to articulate window and door openings. The detailing and building of the show round a door frame is much because it is at a foundation. And as with the foundation condition, setting an even and consistent show that is flush with the frame takes some care.

To attain this particular detail, the door frame must be set prior to drywall installation. This is out of regular sequencing and will throw away an inexperienced builder.

Naturally, the excess material and additional labour add up. Depending upon the base trim material, a detail like this could easily add $5 to $7 per square foot to the cost of your job.

Baldridge Architects

And then there is the mother of all show details. This is the show that is created between the treads and risers of a stair that provides the illusion which the stair disappears behind the walls. Much like other shows, this necessitates an additional layer of drywall and some precise craftsmanship.

Schwartz and Architecture

The Slab Door

Another modern detail is your slab door with top and bottom pivot hinges instead of the typical butterfly type of hinge. The pivot hinges are installed in the ground in addition to at the mind of the door frame instead of the door jambs and are utilized to create a door that’s flush with the wall.

Once the doors have been shut, the wall has a more uniform and monolithic look, a modernist design characteristic for sure. And when the door is open …

… it’s like a large panel, one of many that the wall is made of, is what opens. Architecturally, the doorway becomes a piece of the wall instead of being something completely different from the wall, as in conventional architectural design.

In fact, whereas in conventional architecture the doorway is a celebrated architectural element that announces the link between two rooms, in a modern aesthetic the doorway becomes subservient to the plane of the wall.

These hinges along with the job to set them are generally more costly than a typical hinge and its setup. A pair (typically three or four) of high quality butterfly hinges will put you back around $50; a pair of pivot hinges will likely be 200.

Renzo J Nakata Architects

Storefront Windows

Another identifying characteristic of modern architectural design is your storefront glazing system. These aluminum-framed systems allow for much larger expanses of glass inside smaller-profile supports when compared to wood-framed systems.

The result can be floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall glazing which dematerializes the wall and, therefore, the overall mass of the home. The title, unsurprisingly, comes from the fact that most of these types of systems are utilized for storefronts, where maximizing the glazed area is crucial.

While a storefront system does not necessarily cost more on a square-foot foundation than a conventional window, the absolute size of this window wall at a modern home means that, as a proportion of the budget, glazing and glass will be more.

Jaime Kleinert Architects

Low Roofs

What will a modernist home be with no apartment, or even more appropriately termed, low-slope roofing? These types of roofs require particular care, because they may be prone to leaking if not nicely detailed and constructed. And because gutters and downspouts in the exterior will ruin the overall aesthetic of the home, modern designs frequently depend on using interior roof drains to get and keep water off the roof.

To direct the water to these roof drains and keep water from spilling over the outside walls, the roofs normally have a parapet, or quite low wall, along the perimeter of the roof. These parapets not only keep water from spilling over the edge and onto the wall but they also conceal the slopes and pitches that any roof must have. From the outside a parapet is likely to earn a roof look as though it’s an entirely regular and even geometric shape, when actually it is not.

Rectangular Shapes

Last, a modernist home relies on an overall form that’s generally rectangular and boxy. The exteriors of these boxes are sided using materials that give a uniformity of expression that does not distract from the overall form. So horizontal flush siding using a minimal amount of joints is standard …

Lucid Architecture

… as is a panel system, normally fiber cement, which provides for a monolithic look. And note the use of shows between panels. With shows both inside and outside, there is consistency of detail — a part of any good modern residence.

More:
Modern vs. Contemporary: What is the Difference?
Modern vs. Contemporary: The Interiors Edition

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Modern Icons: Kartell Componibili Storage Modules

The cute small cylinder-shaped bodies of Componibili storage units happen to be in homes around the globe for more than 40 years. Designed by Anna Castelli Ferrieri in 1969, they remind me of stashing my books and mittens in my cubbyhole in elementary school — and I mean that in a good way. Of course, they possess the smart Italian touch; you stick your finger in a round hole at the curved doors and the doors slide open to reveal the compartments.

You will find several different configurations for your Componibili; each drawer of the larger system (15⅛ inches high by 161/2 inches diameter) along with the tray top are sold separately, and you will stack as many zoom units as you’d like. The standalone smaller cabinets simplify the procedure; you could purchase a 2- or three-drawer unit that’s 121/2 inches in diameter as just one single piece of furniture (the two-drawer version is 153/4 inches high, and also the three-drawer version is 23 inches high). If you are considering a Componibili buy, have a gander at all the ways to use these pieces in a variety of space styles and types; I expect this will make your decision easier.

Emily McCall

Place a three-drawer Componibili alongside a favorite reading chair and stash your books, newspapers, studying specs, voucher case, ribbons, crossword puzzles, pens and other unpleasant items indoors. Insert a timeless anglepoise lamp on top and you are ready to go.

Leslie Goodwin Photography

Red adds a playful touch and will hold its own alongside some killer racecar bed and giant Union Jack.

Hufft Projects

The red version is a limited edition, so if you are on the fence about ordering one, then you might want to boost your decision.

FORMA Design

Add castors to put make your Componibili even more portable.

Collette Hanlon Home Stagers

The cabinet makes a smashing side table at a modern room; its curves play sculptural furnishings.

Moon Design + Build

Three drawers make the larger standalone Componibili an extremely helpful modern nightstand, with lots of room for your flashlight, night time mask, love letters and anything else you maintain in there which is not one of my business.

Jordan Parnass Digital Architecture

Another advantage is its slim profile; if you’ve only a little over one foot on one side of the bed, you’ve got loads of space to squeeze one in.

sarah & bendrix

The cabinet fits into more diverse or traditional bedrooms too.

Glamour Nest

The nightstand functions not just for small kiddos and adults, but also for tweens and teens also. Should you purchase one, you’ll always find someplace around the home at which you are able to set it to good use.

Jenn Hannotte / Hannotte Interiors

The Componibili cabinet is a genius addition to a bathroom that combines classic and modern touches. It attracts in iconic Italian modern design, it can conceal those additional rolls of T.P., and you can place your towel or a candle on top of it while you soak in the bathtub.

More:
Modern Icons: The Eames Wire Base Table
Style Trick: Use Office Furniture Outside the Office

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Exotic Laguna Beach Family Home

Joe and Lisa Preston couldn’t wait to move to this traditional Spanish Mediterranean home in California, in which a gorgeous perspective of Laguna Beach meshes beautifully with all the old-world architecture and the owner’s art collection. The plaster walls, vaulted beam ceilings, planked walnut doors and clay roof tiles are a fantastic match for your incomparable sea view from among the city’s best vantage points.

The couple worked with Ohara Davies-Gaetano of Bliss Design to incorporate a vibrant and private design that would grow with their children’ needs and display their collected global art and paintings. “The Prestons are very colorful folks,” says Davies-Gaetano. “They’re also understated, down-to-earth and casual. They just wanted their home to be fabulous, which has been the underlying theme for the job.”

in a Glance
Who lives here: Joe and Lisa Preston and their 3 young children
Location: The mountains of Laguna Beach, California
Size: 3,400 square feet on 3 levels; 4 bedrooms, 3 baths
That’s interesting: An 18th-century turtle shell from France hangs above the mantel.

Bliss Design

The living room is bordered on both sides by glass doors, together with all the sweeping Pacific on one side and a hillside and courtyard on the other. As there’s no anchor wall, the designer pulled everything to the center of the space.

A oversized ottoman with tray in the living room serves as a coffee table. The mother-of-pearl inlay fits the seat in the hallway between the living and dining room.

Leather armchairs: Holly Hunt

Bliss Design

“We don’t see a reason to reduce our layout standard for life with children,” says Joe. The couple believes that should they love the things in their house, their little ones can learn to respect that.

The velvet saffron-yellow couch, chaise and ottoman were custom made and upholstered locally. The colorful throw pillows are covered with textiles collected during the couple’s journeys. The Tibetan hand-woven area rug is coloured with vegetable dye to get a natural gradation, and the antique lamps were purchased from the initial owners of the house.

Bliss Design

A cut and mounted slice of petrified wood is placed before a spectacular abstract art piece by Paul Ecke. “It needed something textural that would not take from the vignette,” says Davies-Gaetano.

When requested his advice into other art collectors, Joe shares,”Our guidance in artwork collection is not to buy a piece for decorative motives. Buy what you love, and it’s going to be a part of your daily life forever.”

Bliss Design

For extra seats with flexibility, Davies-Gaetano placed a matching duvet from the fireplace. This comfortable setup is part of what makes the living room Joe and Lisa’s favourite room in the home. They wanted it to be formal and sophisticated, but also practical and lively. “Ohara attracted that together with all the vibrant colors and the spirit of our artwork, which represents a time and place in our own lives,” says Joe.

One of the last items added to the decoration — and among the greatest splurges — was that the 18th-century turtle shell from France above the mantel. “The extra tortoise shell and butterflies provide the space an exotic feel. We love to travel, and it reminds us of French island living,” says Joe.

Bliss Design

Real butterflies are mounted within a classic wedding veil globe, set on a classic sculptor’s base from France.

The painting of a woman reflected in a pool is by California artist Eric Zener. It holds special significance for Joe, who’s an avid swimmer.

Bliss Design

Like the living room, the sophisticated dining room occupies inside the home’s open floor plan without an anchor wall. The table and chandelier were also inherited by the previous homeowners. Upholstered chairs modeled after Italian antiques perform up the home’s old-world Mediterranean personality. A grass-green ceramic horse sits on a French antique oak chest that’s used for storage.

Floor-to-ceiling windows flow from the dining room to the kitchen. Guests enter the house on the top floor, where the living room, den, dining room, kitchen and master bedroom are located.

Bliss Design

The master bedroom has been flanked by windows and doors on both sides of the bed. Pressed aluminum bedside tables from India and lamps made from gypsum and acrylic assist the space to feel light and airy.

Bliss Design

Davies-Gaetano chose sea-foam linen window treatments and also a graphic headboard to create an effect in the master bedroom limited distance. The headboard fabric — designed from the Uzbekistani suzani design — is manufactured by Donghia.

Bliss Design

The upstairs den is bathed in afternoon light. The preexisting 1950s curtains and also the owners’ vibrant artwork determined the orange and orange color palette. An African mask collection hangs alongside the fireplace, and a blue Tibetan rug warms the floor.

The locally custom-made couch is covered in wool, followed by a Baker reading seat and a Holly Hunt coffee table. The TV sits opposite the couch.

Bliss Design

The guest bedrooms on the lower level kept a lot of the original flair. The orange room’s walls and window treatments are a lively take on the preceding homeowner’s affinity for its citrus colour. “When the family moved in, their 5-year-old daughter said this is her castle in the sky,” Davies-Gaetano says.

Bliss Design

The key garden patio downstairs is tucked right into hedges with tiny pebbles that crunch underfoot. A guest could easily imagine themselves in a timeless European garden. “What makes this house special is that you’ve got different experiences as you go through. To begin with, you don’t see the sea view till you enter the home. Then you go downstairs and have this entirely fresh adventure,” Davies-Gaetano says.

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We've Got a Golden Ticket

Can you remember how you felt watching Willie Wonka & the Chocolate Factory when Charlie opened the Wonka Bar and you saw the glimmering gold ticket? I feel that way in chambers when gold is used at a manner. I feel fancy sitting in an area with delicate touches of golden even when I am not elaborate, which is the majority of the time.

The late American fashion designer Bill Blass, famous for utilizing pattern and texture within a neutral palette, used gold in this manner. In his designs he would utilize an unexpected golden button. In his home he would put a brass fire screen on his hearth that would shimmer with the flames from a neutral palette.

I am not going to say that gold is back, since I don’t think it ever endured. Have a peek at these designers are pulling the gold prize in their own spaces.

J. Hirsch Interior Design

My treasured gold ticket is this powder room with its tasteful gold sink and tap. Now that’s fancy and enjoyable.

For People design

One of my favorite accessories in a while, this gold pachyderm retains its own in this whimsical arrangement.

Charmean Neithart Interiors

I think that the glimmer of this faucet indicates the versatility of gold. Here it is perfectly paired with all the trendy colors of the background and the antiqued mirror. Yes, gold and silver do play nicely together.

Shirley Meisels

Even though this is technically not a metallic gold, the lush gold vibe with this settee is brilliantly positioned one of a variety of shades and textures. If I clarified this room until you could see it, you’d probably say”no method” into its gray walls and hot pink, chartreuse, acrylic and striped rug details — no way would they work together. Way, they can!

Cravotta Interiors

I included this picture simply because it is so over the top. Gold doors embossed with dinosaurs that result in your own personal movie theatre? Why not?

The splash of gold from this pendant is simply enough to set a dramatic tone for this entry, with its own geometric background.

LKID

I really like the imperial elegance of the gold-toned frame on this oil painting. This is just plain stunning.

J. Hirsch Interior Design, LLC

This elegant area of neutrals is perfectly paired with a splash of gold leaf on the legs of the rocking seat. Along with the amber tones of the lamp put off the hanging cloth in the background.

For People design

I adore this vintage-inspired brass division, particularly when paired with the gold tassel lamps and blush shade of the walls.

What will Veruca Salt, the spoiled girl in Willie Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, say? “Gold splashes! Do not care how; I want it today.”

More:
Old Gold Is New Neutral
Taking Home the Gold
Metallic Home Décor Shines On

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